Hosts accepting graduate students and postdocs – by research area

The following researchers/laboratories are open to host an IUBMB research fellowship holder. Note that fellows can also choose to go to laboratories not listed on this page.

If you are a researcher interested in becoming a host, please use the following form:


No Entries Found
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</p><p>Frohlich, Christopher</p><p>

Researcher Name: Frohlich, Christopher (He / Him)

Research Area(s): Computational Biology, Enzymology, Microbiology, Protein Structure and Folding

Affiliation: UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Country: Norway

Scientific Interests:

My research is deeply rooted in the study of beta-lactamases, focusing specifically on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. This involves investigating the complexities surrounding OXA-48 and metallo-beta-lactamases. I’m particularly interested in the evolutionary trade-offs in antibiotic resistance and the synthesis and evaluation of inhibitors against metallo-beta-lactamases.

A significant part of my work includes exploring resistance evolution, especially in the context of antibiotics like ceftazidime-avibactam and cefiderocol. I delve into the biochemistry and genetics of beta-lactamase enzymes to understand how these contribute to antibiotic resistance. My studies involve not just structural analysis of these enzymes but also the design and testing of potential inhibitors.

One of my key research themes is understanding the adaptation and evolution of beta-lactamase enzymes and their impact on the efficacy of antibiotics. This includes research on enzyme promiscuity, the cryptic evolution of beta-lactamases, and the influence of biofilm lifestyles on their evolution. I have also contributed to the field by studying the synthesis and biological evaluation of zinc chelating compounds and fluorinated captopril analogues as inhibitors, highlighting potential strategies to combat antibiotic resistance.

Through my research, I aim to address the critical global challenge of rising antibiotic-resistant bacteria by offering insights into the molecular mechanisms of resistance and exploring potential therapeutic interventions.

This offer applies to trainees/researchers eligible for the following fellowships

Everyone (not restricted to fellowship holders)

Contact:

cfr016@uit.no

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No Entries Found
No Entries Found
</p><p>Frohlich, Christopher</p><p>

Researcher Name: Frohlich, Christopher (He / Him)

Research Area(s): Computational Biology, Enzymology, Microbiology, Protein Structure and Folding

Affiliation: UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Country: Norway

Scientific Interests:

My research is deeply rooted in the study of beta-lactamases, focusing specifically on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. This involves investigating the complexities surrounding OXA-48 and metallo-beta-lactamases. I’m particularly interested in the evolutionary trade-offs in antibiotic resistance and the synthesis and evaluation of inhibitors against metallo-beta-lactamases.

A significant part of my work includes exploring resistance evolution, especially in the context of antibiotics like ceftazidime-avibactam and cefiderocol. I delve into the biochemistry and genetics of beta-lactamase enzymes to understand how these contribute to antibiotic resistance. My studies involve not just structural analysis of these enzymes but also the design and testing of potential inhibitors.

One of my key research themes is understanding the adaptation and evolution of beta-lactamase enzymes and their impact on the efficacy of antibiotics. This includes research on enzyme promiscuity, the cryptic evolution of beta-lactamases, and the influence of biofilm lifestyles on their evolution. I have also contributed to the field by studying the synthesis and biological evaluation of zinc chelating compounds and fluorinated captopril analogues as inhibitors, highlighting potential strategies to combat antibiotic resistance.

Through my research, I aim to address the critical global challenge of rising antibiotic-resistant bacteria by offering insights into the molecular mechanisms of resistance and exploring potential therapeutic interventions.

This offer applies to trainees/researchers eligible for the following fellowships

Everyone (not restricted to fellowship holders)

Contact:

cfr016@uit.no

Close this page to return to list of all hosts

No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
</p><p>Frohlich, Christopher</p><p>

Researcher Name: Frohlich, Christopher (He / Him)

Research Area(s): Computational Biology, Enzymology, Microbiology, Protein Structure and Folding

Affiliation: UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Country: Norway

Scientific Interests:

My research is deeply rooted in the study of beta-lactamases, focusing specifically on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. This involves investigating the complexities surrounding OXA-48 and metallo-beta-lactamases. I’m particularly interested in the evolutionary trade-offs in antibiotic resistance and the synthesis and evaluation of inhibitors against metallo-beta-lactamases.

A significant part of my work includes exploring resistance evolution, especially in the context of antibiotics like ceftazidime-avibactam and cefiderocol. I delve into the biochemistry and genetics of beta-lactamase enzymes to understand how these contribute to antibiotic resistance. My studies involve not just structural analysis of these enzymes but also the design and testing of potential inhibitors.

One of my key research themes is understanding the adaptation and evolution of beta-lactamase enzymes and their impact on the efficacy of antibiotics. This includes research on enzyme promiscuity, the cryptic evolution of beta-lactamases, and the influence of biofilm lifestyles on their evolution. I have also contributed to the field by studying the synthesis and biological evaluation of zinc chelating compounds and fluorinated captopril analogues as inhibitors, highlighting potential strategies to combat antibiotic resistance.

Through my research, I aim to address the critical global challenge of rising antibiotic-resistant bacteria by offering insights into the molecular mechanisms of resistance and exploring potential therapeutic interventions.

This offer applies to trainees/researchers eligible for the following fellowships

Everyone (not restricted to fellowship holders)

Contact:

cfr016@uit.no

Close this page to return to list of all hosts

No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
No Entries Found
</p><p>Frohlich, Christopher</p><p>

Researcher Name: Frohlich, Christopher (He / Him)

Research Area(s): Computational Biology, Enzymology, Microbiology, Protein Structure and Folding

Affiliation: UiT The Arctic University of Norway

Country: Norway

Scientific Interests:

My research is deeply rooted in the study of beta-lactamases, focusing specifically on antibiotic resistance mechanisms. This involves investigating the complexities surrounding OXA-48 and metallo-beta-lactamases. I’m particularly interested in the evolutionary trade-offs in antibiotic resistance and the synthesis and evaluation of inhibitors against metallo-beta-lactamases.

A significant part of my work includes exploring resistance evolution, especially in the context of antibiotics like ceftazidime-avibactam and cefiderocol. I delve into the biochemistry and genetics of beta-lactamase enzymes to understand how these contribute to antibiotic resistance. My studies involve not just structural analysis of these enzymes but also the design and testing of potential inhibitors.

One of my key research themes is understanding the adaptation and evolution of beta-lactamase enzymes and their impact on the efficacy of antibiotics. This includes research on enzyme promiscuity, the cryptic evolution of beta-lactamases, and the influence of biofilm lifestyles on their evolution. I have also contributed to the field by studying the synthesis and biological evaluation of zinc chelating compounds and fluorinated captopril analogues as inhibitors, highlighting potential strategies to combat antibiotic resistance.

Through my research, I aim to address the critical global challenge of rising antibiotic-resistant bacteria by offering insights into the molecular mechanisms of resistance and exploring potential therapeutic interventions.

This offer applies to trainees/researchers eligible for the following fellowships

Everyone (not restricted to fellowship holders)

Contact:

cfr016@uit.no

Close this page to return to list of all hosts

No Entries Found
No Entries Found